Assembly recognised once again with nomination in the Action on Hearing Loss Excellence Wales Awards

Logo for the Action on Hearing Loss Excellence Wales Awards

We are delighted to have once again been shortlisted for recognition at the Action on Hearing Loss Excellence Wales Awards. This year we have been shortlisted for the Service Excellence category and are also entered into the People’s Choice Award.

We constantly strive to excel in the services we provide for people who are deaf or have hearing loss and are always looking for new opportunities to enhance this service. Currently, we provide services for people who are deaf or have hearing loss by:

  • Engaging with deaf organisations across Wales. We deliver presentations to encourage democratic engagement and use BSL videos and communication support when necessary.
  • Ensuring that we have loop systems available across our estate and portable amplification loops for people taking part in tours.
  • Providing BSL and subtitles for weekly First Minister’s Questions – this is the most popular watched aspect of Assembly Business.
  • Using online consultation fora like Diolog and Loomio to increase online democratic engagement.

We have also ensured that our staff have the confidence and support to effectively communicate with people who are deaf or have a hearing loss. We have done this by:

  • Rolling out mandatory online equality training for all staff that includes disability awareness and reasonable adjustments when communicating with people who are deaf or have a hearing loss. In addition, many staff, including all of our public-facing staff have undergone Disability Confidence training to ensure that they can effectively respond to people’s needs. Many staff have supplemented this with further deaf awareness training, achieving BSL to level 2.
  • Developing factsheets on promoting disability confidence, making reasonable adjustments, tips for effective communication and booking communication support. These have been shared with all staff through our intranet.

You can vote for the Assembly to win the People’s Choice Award at https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/excellencewales

 

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Ministerial Appointments: Pre appointment hearings

Simon Thomas AC/AMSimon Thomas AM, Chair of the Finance Committee, made a statement in Plenary on 5th April 2017 on the Committee’s behalf, outlining its experience of their pre appointment hearing for the Chair of the Welsh Revenue Authority.

The Welsh Revenue Authority (WRA) will be established to collect and manage devolved Welsh taxes and will become operational from April 2018. The WRA is non-ministerial department of the Welsh Government. The Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Local Government believed a pre appointment hearing would be beneficial given the unique status and governance arrangements for the Chair of the WRA.

The Committee felt encouraged by the Cabinet Secretary’s commitment to transparency and accountability in recruiting public appointments, and welcomed the opportunity to help improve this procedure future pre appointment hearings. The Committee recognised the Cabinet Secretary’s commitment to pre-appointment hearings, indeed, the Cabinet Secretary published an article in 2012 where he acknowledged the importance of pre appointment hearings. The Chair recognises that the Cabinet Secretary has taken the first steps to bring the Assembly in line with other parliamentary bodies who already have an established process in relation to pre appointment hearings.

In the Committee Statement the Chair detailed the constructive results the hearing produced; including giving the candidate exposure to parliamentary scrutiny in a public setting, something which an appointee to a post of this level needs to be prepared for.
In the statement, the Chair voiced that, as with any new procedure there is room for improvement. He outlined the Finance Committee’s suggestions for future pre-appointment hearings to include;

  • A statement by the Cabinet Secretary outlining why the Minister/Cabinet Secretary believes the candidate is suitable for the post.
  • Additional reporting time to be factored into the timescales.
  • Establishing a set list of public appointments that require a pre-appointment hearing.
  • The Chair’s vision for pre appointment hearings in the future is for them to strengthen transparency and accountability of ministerial appointments, which will increase public confidence in decisions made by both the Welsh Government and the Assembly.

You can find out more about the Assembly’s Finance Committee by visiting assembly.wales/seneddfinance. You can also follow the committee on Twitter @SeneddFinance.
Continue reading “Ministerial Appointments: Pre appointment hearings”

Start your career in security at the National Assembly for Wales

We take security seriously at the National Assembly for Wales. Last year we welcomed over 60,000 visitors to our buildings, hosted HRH the Queen at the Official Opening of the Assembly and cheered for our Olympians and Paralympians at the Homecoming event.

Security Officers at the National Assembly for Wales

Our Security team ensure the safety and security of everyone who works at or visits the Assembly and are the first point of contact for all visitors to the estate.

We are currently looking to create a reserve list for joining our security team at the National Assembly for Wales. So, if you want to be informed as soon as new vacancies are available, please get in touch.

Interested?

Security Officers Laura, Shane and Dean talk about why the National Assembly for Wales could be the place for you.

How is working here different to other security jobs?

“I don’t think I’ve used Welsh in any of my other jobs. I like speaking to the public, and talking to Front of House colleagues really helps to get my Welsh up to standard.”
Shane

“It’s more challenging. I used to work in a coffee shop and I’ve gained so many more skills working here.”
Laura

“It’s very family orientated and a really supportive environment.”
Dean

HRH The Queen at the official opening of the Assembly

By joining the National Assembly for Wales you’ll get to work in two of the most iconic buildings in Wales – the Senedd and Pierhead – and see Welsh politics in action in the Siambr.

Some Welsh language skills are essential for the role. Anyone interested in applying should be able to:

  • understand sentences when people talk about everyday situations, and
  • hold a conversation with someone on a common topic e.g. work, hobbies, future plans.

 What do you like about working for the Assembly?

“You meet some interesting people, there’s always something on.”
Shane

“Every day there’s something different, there’s different functions on, and you learn how to treat people with different needs. In my last job I wouldn’t have felt confident with that, but I do now.”
Laura

Our security staff are trained to be aware of the needs of visitors with disabilities, or who might have specific requirements based on their religious beliefs.

Welsh Olympians and Paralympians

So what does a typical day involve?

As well as monitoring the buildings, Security staff greet all visitors and ensure safety on the estate. They also work with Assembly Members, other departments and external organisations to plan events at the Assembly.

As the first point of contact for visitors, the Security team have picked up quite a bit of feedback on our Trip Advisor and Senedd Facebook pages. Some recent comments include:

“…friendly and extremely helpful security…”

“…very efficient but good humoured security guards…”

“The security staff are very nice and friendly, when they say ‘Welcome to the Welsh Assembly building…’ with a friendly smile it really does make a nice impact”.

 What’s been a personal highlight for you while working here?

“Being able to work at the Royal Opening. You see these things on the tv and you never think you’ll have the opportunity to be part of it. That and meeting Greg Davies from the Inbetweeners when he was here.”
Laura

“The Royal Opening – being involved with something that prestigious”.
Dean

“Meeting Bruce Dickinson from Iron Maiden, he’s one of my heroes”.
Shane

Security officers at a Senedd Fun Day

What would you say to someone thinking about applying for the role?

“It’s a fantastic organisation, they support you when you need it”.
Laura

“The well-being side is really good, you can develop yourself as an individual”.
Dean

The Assembly is an exciting place to work with progressive policies and a commitment to training and development. Further information on the benefits of working for us can be found on our recruitment pages.

Get updates for new Security vacancies

To find out more about jobs in Security at the National Assembly for Wales, and to get updates about new vacancies please email your CV to jobs@assembly.wales

 

Current vacancies   |   Work for a Member

 

A male voice choir performs at the Senedd

Wales in your words

To celebrate St. David’s Day we asked hundreds of people to describe what Wales means to them in just one word

We invited visitors to the Senedd to write their word on a postcard and leave it with us. We also filmed some particularly patriotic volunteers…

It’s been fantastic to see so many different words showing a range of emotions, connections and viewpoints. It comes as a reminder of the many different voices the National Assembly for Wales represents.

Gwlad mewn geiriau / Wales in your words

It has also confirmed a few things we may have already known…

Wales doesn’t have the best weather…

A lot of words alluded to the famous Welsh climate with cold, grey, rainy and wet all making an appearance. One postcard gave the word warm followed by the clarification ‘not weather though’ in brackets. Just in case we got the wrong idea.

warmcard

rainy-grey-cards

… but it’s beautiful, and you’re proud of it.

Two of the most popular words were variations of beautiful and pride. The unique landscape of Wales was also covered by the words spectacular, scenic, mountains and green.

stunning-green

pride-balchder

Wales is a land of history, culture and song…

Many words reflected Wales’s rich heritage, with a number of you choosing culture, history, language, legends, rugby and music.

 While the word football didn’t get a mention, we did get a Bale!

culture-rugby

Wales is your home…

Home, cartref and adref in Welsh, was overwhelmingly the most common word submitted across all languages. People gave us lots of related words which sum up a sense of home and belonging including: community, hiraeth, together, welcome, etifeddiaeth, united, love, solidarity and roots.

home-circle

Continue reading “Wales in your words”

LGBT History Month – The Importance of Role Models

Having visible LGBT role models can have a transformative impact on creating a truly inclusive workplace and society.

Stonewall’s guide, Role Models: Being lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender in Wales, features inspirational stories from a diverse range of people from different backgrounds working in different areas. You will recognise a couple of them!

Stonewall have also published LGBT voices, a collection of personal stories from LGBT people who have lived through inequalities and experiences rarely reflected on television, in books, in films or in schools.

It is of course important to note that different LGBT groups will have different role models. The Pride Power List 2016 contains a diverse selection of LGBT role models: male, female, non-binary, trans, disabled, Black, Asian, people of faith, older people, and people from a range of backgrounds and careers.

Here, some members of our LGBT workplace network explain why role models are important to them:

“The people I have a lot of respect for are the people who are prepared to go that one step further and put their head above the parapet and challenge the status quo. You shouldn’t underestimate the impact that visibility makes to people. It makes a difference to people when it’s not abstract anymore. There are still a lot of stereotypical ideas so a diverse range of role models is important. I want to be part of creating a modern Wales, a Wales that’s representative.” Hannah Blythyn, AM

“It’s important to have diverse role models; one person is not the totality of gay experience.” Rhys Morgan, Translation and Reporting Service

“It’s very important that there are visible LGBT people within the organisation, that people see that being from a minority group hasn’t hindered peoples’ ability to reach senior levels. We have young people who say it took three years to come out in their previous organisation and three weeks here. If you’ve reached a position of success, if you can inspire someone else, if you can lead by example, you should.” Craig Stephenson, Director of Commission Services and Co-Chair of OUT-NAW

“I think role models help show that it is ok to be you.  They show you that there should be no limits on who you can be and what you can achieve.  The more role models there are and the more diversity they represent, the more we can break down barriers and challenge misconceptions.” Lisa Bowkett, Head of Finance and Co-Chair of OUT-NAW.

LGBT History Month – what progress we’ve made!

Photograph of Claire Clancy wearing a rainbow garland to prepare for Pride Cymru

By Claire Clancy, Chief Executive and Clerk of the Assembly

Since I joined the Assembly in 2007, I have seen a tremendous amount of change in making the Assembly more inclusive.

As this is my last LGBT History Month in the Assembly I have been reflecting specifically on how far we have come in our support of LGBT people and the promotion of LGBT equality. Over the years, we have won many awards for this work, we have increased our outreach, attended more events, reviewed and enhanced policies, provided training and raised awareness to make us a more inclusive employer.

We are very lucky to have an excellent workplace network in OUT-NAW and a dedicated Diversity and Inclusion Team who work extremely hard to further LGBT equality. I would like to take this opportunity to publically thank them for their work.

During my time here, I have had lots of conversations with Craig, co-chair of OUT-NAW, about how we can continue to make progress. I’m very happy to say that I was the first person to sign up to the Allies programme.

Last summer, I had lots of fun joining the network and LGBT Allies at the Pride March through the streets of Cardiff. It was a wonderful experience to see so many people celebrating diversity and inclusion.

I am proud of everything that we have achieved and I am proud to be an ally. I look forward to following the continued success of the Assembly. See you at Pride!

Logo with a rainbow that reads Proud to an Allylogo for LGBT History Month 2017logo for Stonewall's Top 100 employers 2017     logo for OUT NAW the Assembly's LGBT workplace network

photo of Assembly staff at Pridephoto of LGBT staff and allies with the rainbow flag

LGBT History Month – Proud to be an LGBT Ally

Logo with a rainbow that reads Proud to an Ally

There has been massive social changes that have resulted in legal protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people in the UK. However, there remain challenges and battles, not only in the UK but across the world. Discrimination and prejudice are still suffered by LGBT people, and there are particular difficulties around the support and protection of transgender people, in schools, in prisons, in workplaces and on the street.

Allies recognise that it’s not just the responsibility of LGBT people to create an inclusive culture. The action they take can range from being a leader of an organisation that puts LGBT equality at the heart of their work to being a junior member of staff who challenges homophobic banter amongst colleagues.

Below, some of our colleagues outline why being an LGBT ally is important to them.

“I have a gay brother and I’ve seen first-hand some of the struggles he’s had through school and into adulthood.  It’s always struck me as unfair the way some people try to use a person’s sexuality against them.  I’m proud of the Assembly’s achievements on LGBT equality and how an inclusive and diverse working culture can create a great place to work. For all of these reasons, I became an Ally.”

“It’s important for me to support my colleagues by being an Ally of OUT-NAW because I believe that everyone deserves the right to be happy and comfortable in their workplace. Becoming an ally of the LGBT network was the natural thing to do for me, since we don’t need a stage to be who we are. Life is not an audition, and to quote the chorus of that memorable song, taken from La Cage Aux Folles: Life’s not worth a damn ‘til you can say, Hey World, I am what I am.”

“Signing up to the allies programme didn’t require any thought. For me, it’s about personal values and a lesson learnt early about treating others in a way you would want to be treated. People don’t leave who they are at the door when they come to work, and that’s the motivation for me and why it’s important to be an ally. We all adopt personas in the workplace to some extent, but not being able to be yourself, on a fundamental level, is something I would not want to tolerate. So I support LGBT equality because I can’t think of a single reason not to.”

“LGBT people are our doctors, our nurses, our police officer, our family, our friends. They are Muslim, Christian, atheist. They are Black, White, Asian. They are disabled. They are young and old. They are male, female and everything in between. As the late MP Jo Cox said, “we are far more united and have far more in common with each other than things that divide us”, and as long as there is a fight for LGBT equality, I will stand by their side as an ally.”

“I didn’t think twice before becoming an Ally. I was going to say that ‘I think everyone has the right to be themselves’ but I don’t think that, I know that! Everyone does have the right to be themselves. Sexuality doesn’t define you as a person, relationships and friendships are about love, not gender. And in the words of Lady Gaga – “No matter gay, straight, or bi, lesbian, transgendered life, I’m on the right track baby, I was born to survive.”

“I’m proud to work at the Assembly, because of the work that we do, and because of the contribution that we make for the people of Wales. I became an ally of Out-NAW in my first week at the Assembly because it’s important to me that the people I work with can be themselves, without fear or prejudice, and can feel equally proud of the Assembly as an inclusive, welcoming employer. Working here feels honest, diverse, and celebratory – great stuff!”

For more information on our LGBT network, our allies or about LGBT-inclusion within the Assembly, please contact the Diversity and Inclusion Team.

Further information and tips on how allies can help to create an LGBT-inclusive workplace are available in Stonewall’s workplace guide.

logo for OUT NAW the Assembly's LGBT workplace network